Make a Cookie Tin Waterer Heater. Under $10, & 10 minutes!

You can make your own waterer heater for use with either metal or plastic waterers. It will cost less than $10, cost pennies to run and you can complete the project in under ten minutes.

Winter brings many challenges for the backyard chicken-keeper, and frozen water is chief among them.  You can make your own waterer heater for use with either metal or plastic waterers. It will cost less than $10, cost pennies to run and you can complete the project in under ten minutes!

Make your own waterer heater for use with either metal or plastic waterers. It will cost less than $10, cost pennies to run and you can complete the project in under ten minutes!

We had record-breaking, sub-zero temperatures for long periods of time in 2010 here in Connectictut and my waterers never iced over the way they used to without these heaters.  It doesn’t seem as though a humble, 40 watt lightbulb should be able to produce enough warmth to keep the water in a plastic waterer from icing over, but remarkably, it does!

It doesn't seem as though a humble, 40 watt lightbulb should be able to produce enough warmth to keep the water in a plastic waterer from icing over, but remarkably, it does!

Supplies:

  • 10″, metal cookie tin (available at most dollar & thrift stores & likely in your garage or basement)
  • lamp assembly kit (available oniline, at hardware & home improvement stores OR buy a thrift store/tag sale lamp and take it apart)0
  • 40 watt, incandescent light bulb (in deep-freeze conditions, use a 60 watt bulb)(in light of the government phase-out, some users recommend 40 watt candelabra bulbs or CFL bulbs, but I have not, so I cannot vouch for their effectiveness)
  • Drill with 3/8″ drill bit
Lamp assembly parts.
Lamp assembly parts

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Drill a hole in the side of the cookie tin.

String the pre-threaded lamp stem assembly through the hole & tighten the screw on the stem.

2. String the pre-threaded lamp stem assembly through the hole & tighten the screw on the stem.

Screw in the light bulb.

3. Screw in the light bulb. Voila!

 You can make your own waterer heater for use with either metal or plastic waterers. It will cost less than $10, cost pennies to run and you can complete the project in under ten minutes.

TO USE:

Put the top on the cookie tin and place the tin on a cinder block or another level surface in the chicken run.  Plug into a GFI outlet. Place metal or plastic waterer on top of the water heater when freezing temperatures are anticipated. Disconnect when not in use or use a ThermoCube to turn the unit on when temperatures reache 35°F.

It doesn't seem as though a humble, 40 watt lightbulb should be able to produce enough warmth to keep the water in a plastic waterer from icing over, but remarkably, it does!

When I made my first cookie tin water heater, I found it difficult to believe that this device, which barely felt warm to the touch, could possibly do the intended job. I was only convinced the first frigid morning I went out into the run and found no ice ring to chip out of the waterer. You may have to try it to believe it too.

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KayMicheleKathy, The Chicken Chick®Wanda ArnoldArlene Recent comment authors
ADozenGirlz
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I'm going to have to give them another shot then b/c I wasn't persuaded that they really worked the first time.
It's supposed to get down to 22 degrees F tonight, so I suppose now is as good a time as any!

Anonymous
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Anonymous

The thermo cubes have been real time/energy savers for us. We've used them successfully for the heated dog mats, horsetank heater, and the heated water dish.

Little Susie Home Maker
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I love this idea. I have one of the $50 heater bases. (Eek!) but I need another for my other side of coop with my 3 month olds in it. I am going to try it! My girls will be very thankful, and I will too!
Hugs,
Little Susie Home Maker

ADozenGirlz
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Interesting you should mention the thermo cube b/c I tried using them twice before with no luck. Have you had experience with them.

Anonymous
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Anonymous

Great idea, I'm going to make one for the dogs. If you use a thermo cube on the plug end it will cycle on the electricity when the temperature drops below 35degree. That would make it unnecessary to unplug the unit when the weather warms up.