My PVC Chicken Feeder. DIY instructions!

DIY PVC feeder - The Chicken Chick®

Wasted chicken feed drives me nuts and I was determined to build a feeder that would put an end to chickens billing feed out onto the ground. After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC  feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.

After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
This is the finished feeder in my “Little Deuce Coop.”
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
Side view of the feeder.

MATERIALS LIST:

A PVC pipe or irrigation tubing, cut to the length that will fit your chosen location. (I used a 4″ wide pipe for the feed and a smaller one for the oyster shell,  various sizes will work)
A PVC pipe cap for the top. (I used a 4″ cap, found in plumbing section of Home Depot)
A high corner litter pan
A piece of scrap wood
Extra long zip ties
3 screws
3 washers
A drill

After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.

LET’S MAKE IT!

After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
  1. Drill four holes in the pipe, two on each side where they will align with holes in stud. (see photo above)
  2. Drill two holes through the stud at measured increments that mirror the holes in the pipe. ( photo below)
  3. Mark where the “feed dish” will be mounted. The pipe should sit approximately 1/4″-1/2″ above the bottom of the feed dish. If the dish is too close to the bottom of the pipe, the feed will not flow out into the dish.
    After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.

    4. Secure the scrap piece of wood to the stud with screws and washers. (as shown below)
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
The high corner litter pan
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.

For an oyster shell or grit dispenser:

  1. Pre-drill one hole in a PVC pipe cap . Cap should be two inches wider than the pipe.
  2. Secure the pipe cap to the stud with a screw and washer.
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.

For a feed dispenser using a corner litter pan for feed:

  1. pre-drill two holes in the back of the litter pan where it will mount to the stud. Space them so that the washers align one above the other
  2. Secure the corner litter pan to the stud with screws and washers.
  3. Thread a zip tie through the two holes in the pipe and then the two holes in the stud and secure the zip tie to itself.
  4. Do the same for the second set of holes in the pipe and stud.
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.

*NOTE: If installing feeder in the run, be sure to securely cover it at dusk to guard against rodents.
Click here for more tips on rodent control in and around the coop.**

After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
Completed oyster shell dispenser
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
The finished feeder
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
I cover my feeders with a PVC cap
After much research, contemplating dozens of designs and several iterations of my own, I am now happy with my PVC feeder. There are no longer piles of wasted grain on the floor, which makes me, my chickens and my feed budget happy. Mine cost approximately $12.00 to build and was finished in 20 minutes.
Rachel Divider

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TheChickenChick
8 years ago

Right on!

TheChickenChick
8 years ago

Try a tarp with a bungee cord.

Denise
Denise
8 years ago

The litter pan is actually a small (ferret) animal litter pan. It is not in the cat isle as I had originally thought, there is no way a cat can fit in it. I also switched to pellets, and I was surprised as I mixed it with the crumble to transition and my hens go for the pellet first. In my opinion, and if constructed as the directions state, this actually takes a lot less space than a hanging feeder.

swimmy44
swimmy44
8 years ago

I could have done this easily in my old chicken coop which was large and like a fortress – now I have a hanging feeder that I must pick up due to rats chowing down after dusk. It's a great idea for people who have big chicken houses. I downsized after moving to California.

TheChickenChick
8 years ago

I indicated that this is built with a corner litter pan, sorry you got confused with the word "litter," but glad you built it and it works for you!

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