Chicken Heat Stress, Dehydration and Homemade Electrolyte Solution

Heat stress is a very serious situation for chickens and can quickly go from serious to deadly.

Heat stress is a very serious situation for chickens and can quickly go from serious to deadly. Even when pulling out all the stops to keep our chickens safe in the heat, according to Gail Damerow in The Chicken Encyclopedia, “During long periods of extreme heat, hens stop laying and all chickens suffer stress. When temperatures reach 104° F (40° C) or above, chickens can’t lose excess heat fast enough to maintain a proper body temperature and may die.”

Rachel Divider
Lucy has her wings spread away from her body in an effort to allow air to circulate closer to her body.
Lucy has her wings spread away from her body in an effort to allow air to circulate closer to her body.

Among the many ways to combat heat stress that I covered in my blog post Beat the Heat, is supplementing their drinking water with electrolytes. I recommend keeping vitamins and electrolytes handy in a well stocked chicken first aid kit, but in an emergency, it is possible to make electrolytes with ingredients commonly found in most homes.

In temps over 90°F, keep a bucket of cool water near the chickens at all times for emergency cooling.
The orange bucket is kept full of cool water in case of emergency.

The mister was a bargain at less than ten dollars and keeps the surrounding area cool.

In temperatures over 90° F, keep a bucket or tub full of cool, water (not cold) near the flock at all times. If anyone begins to look overheated, panting, wings away from its sides, droopy, lethargic or pale in the wattles and comb, IMMEDIATELY submerge in the cool water up to its neck to bring its body temperature down. This simple measure can be lifesaving. Even if chickens are not in danger, this can be a welcome relief to chickens that would not voluntarily wade into water.

A dehydrated chicken may exhibit any or all of the following symptoms, which could result in death:

  • panting or labored breathing
  • pale comb and/or wattles
  • spreading wings away from body
  • diarrhea
  • lethargy
  • limpness
  • unresponsive
  • seizures,convulsions

Heat stress and dehydration deplete the body of electrolytes required for a chicken’s normal body functioning, therefore replenishing them is a priority when chickens suffer from heat stress and/or dehydration. The following instructions for making a homemade electrolyte solution can be found in The Chicken Encyclopedia.

While we're on the topic of heat advisories, it bears repeating that while apple cider vinegar is beneficial to to chickens when added to their water most times of the year, BUT ACV should NOT be added to waterers during times of high heat.

HOMEMADE ELECTROLYTE SOLUTION

INGREDIENTS

1/2 teaspoon potassium chloride (Morton salt substitute) (If you don’t have it, omit it)
1 teaspoon sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)
1 teaspoon sodium chloride (table salt)
1 tablespoon sucrose (sugar)
1 gallon water

Administer this solution to dehydrated chickens in place of drinking water for four to six hours per day for a week, offering fresh water for the remainder of each day.”

ADVISORY: Electrolytes should not be given to healthy chickens who are not suffering from heat stress or dehydration.

Electrolyte ice for heat stress in chickens

Mix up electrolytes in drinker & freeze overnight for a cold way to restore electrolyte balance in birds suffering from heat stress.

While we’re on the topic of heat advisories, it bears repeating that vinegar should NOT be added to drinking water during times of high heat. According to Dr. Mike Petrik, DVM, MSc, a poultry veterinarian,  “Acidified water affects laying hens by making the calcium in her feed a little less digestible (based on chemistry….calcium is a positive ion, and dissociates better in a more alkaline environment). Professional farmers regularly add baking soda to their feed when heat stress is expected….this maintains egg shell quality when hens’ feed consumption drops due to the heat.”

In summary, during high heat conditions, baking soda facilitates calcium absorption while ACV inhibits it. SKIP the ACV in the heat, opting for an electrolyte solution instead.

In summary, during high heat conditions, baking soda facilitates calcium absorption while vinegar inhibits it.  SKIP the vinegar in the heat, opting for an electrolyte solution instead.

Hens standing in water from a sprinkler in hot weather. | The Chicken Chick®

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TheChickenChick
TheChickenChick
7 years ago

My pleasure, Jessi. Welcome to chicken keeping!

Jessi
Jessi
7 years ago

Thank you for addressing the ACV solution in summer heat! I'm a first time chicken momma in N Florida where the temps are 90+ most days. Although my flock is healthy, I add ACV to their water about twice a month. The water is changed out daily, but I would hate to encourage dehydration.

nikki_r5
nikki_r5
7 years ago

Um, I just get them to open their beaks by touching the back of the jaw w/ my syringe. (has long, curved end) I put it at the back of the tongue. Is this a problem ?
I lost 1 hen 2 days ago & 1 came down ill this AM. Heat Stress or Cidicios sp?

BG's Studio 13
BG's Studio 13
7 years ago

ATET Submission by Bettie Gordon Melinda’s deep dark secret is that she fell in love with aLeghorn. Yes it’s true; I fell in love with a big, handsome, white Roo that I saw on the television one day as I peered in the window (sorry for being a snoop Kathy). He was magnificent and oh so dreamy. They called him Foghorn Leghorn, and I knew right away that I wanted to be Mrs. Foghorn Leghorn. I dreamed of the wedding and how we would gaze in each other’s eyes and say I DO. Then one day I saw him again… Read more »

Tina Edwards
Tina Edwards
7 years ago

"ATET submission" Melinda is a reformed egg eater. She claims it was peer pressure that drove her to try the delectable liquid from that first cracked egg. Having undergone a rigorous therapy program designed to break the habit, Melinda contemplated a more pious career in a convent. At least there she might be safe from temptation and that wicked Liza!
~Tina E. aka nuzzymom1