How to Hardcook & Peel Fresh Eggs EASILY

Ever wonder why store-bought eggs are so easy to peel? Simply put- they're old

Ever wonder why store-bought eggs are so easy to peel? Simply put- they’re old. Hard cooked, fresh eggs are harder to peel than old eggs, which can be frustrating if you don’t know the secret to peeling them easily. And here’s a hint: there are no additives required!

Rachel Divider
Hard cooked, fresh eggs are harder to peel than old eggs, which can be frustrating if you don't know the secret to peeling them easily. And here's a hint: there are no additives required!

When the bloom of an egg is compromised by washing or age, it becomes more porous, allowing air into the egg and some of the carbon dioxide in the white to escape. This decreases the acidity of the white, which decreases the ability of the white to cling to the egg’s inner membrane.

Basic Egg Anatomy
*Basic Egg anatomy

When eggs age, they also lose moisture through the pores, causing the air space on the wide end of the egg to increase and the white to pull further away from the shell membrane. When the membrane is further from the shell, eggs are easier to peel. Similar results can be accomplished by letting backyard eggs remain in your refrigerator for a few weeks but then they wouldn’t be fresh, would they? Armed with this information, peeling fresh eggs can be done successfully and with a minimum of muttering under your breath.

Coturnix quail eggs take only 6 minutes to steam to hard-cooked stage.
Coturnix quail eggs take only 6 minutes to steam to hard-cooked stage

HARD COOKED, FRESH EGGS: THE STEAM AND ICE METHOD

  • In a covered pot with a steamer basket in it, bring several inches of water to a boil
  • Carefully add the eggs to steamer basket when water is boiling.
  • Turn down heat to simmer, cover and steam for 15 minutes
  • Immediately remove eggs from steamer and place into a bowl of ice water
  • When cool enough to handle, crack and peel.

Immediately after removing steamed eggs from the heat, plunge into an ice bath.
quail egg peels easily after steaming and an ice bath

Here's a twist on tuna using hard-cooked eggs that results in an interesting, high-protein dish served as a sandwich, on top of a salad, mixed into cold pasta or eaten it as-is.

Here’s a twist on tuna using  hard-cooked eggs that results in an interesting, high-protein dish served as a sandwich, on top of a salad, mixed into cold pasta or eaten it as-is.

TUNA EGG SALAD RECIPE

Yield 4 servings
Prep Time 30 minutes
Difficulty Easy

Here’s a twist on tuna using hard-cooked eggs that results in an interesting, high-protein dish served as a sandwich, on top of a salad, mixed into cold pasta or eaten it as-is.

INGREDIENTS

Tuna egg salad
ingredients
1 can of Tuna Fish, drained
2 Hardboiled Eggs, peeled & chopped
Mayo, to taste
Celery, chopped
Fresh Parsley, chopped
Fresh Chives, chopped
Salt & Pepper, to taste

LET’S MAKE IT!

Mix all ingredients thoroughly.
Serve on bread for a sandwich, on lettuce for a salad or mix into cold pasta for pasta salad as a main dish or side.


Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

*Anatomical illustrations and photo reproduced for educational purposes, courtesy of  Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore and Austin Cantor, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Copyright 2011. Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, M. Scott Smith, Director, Land Grant Programs, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Lexington,and Kentucky State University, Frankfort. Copyright 2011 for materials developed by University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension. This publication may be reproduced in portions or its entirety for educational and nonprofit purposes only. Permitted users shall give credit to the author(s) and include this copyright notice. Publications are also available on the World Wide Web at www.ca.uky.edu. Issued 02-2011

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Dave
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Dave

What I've found is the age of the egg matters less than the age of the hen, new girl eggs can hardly be peeled, but older hens egg shells slip right off. I will try your method and see what happens. Let me give you a tip, in my restaurant I teach staff to use a table spoon for removing shells when you get good at it you can do dozens in minutes with the shell in 1 piece give it a try you'll be amazed at how easy it is with a little practice. Love your site, plan on… Read more »

Linda Noble
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Linda Noble

Love these two recipies, thanks!

Angela LaRose
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Angela LaRose

So I guess my question is how to do a fresh egg so it's still a bit runny for breakfast? I find it makes a giant mess to make soft boiled eggs from the previous days eggs round up

Gina
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Gina

I go to your resources for everything I do now, Kathy! It's amazing how much educational material you have!

Veronica Johnson-Cavins
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Veronica Johnson-Cavins

Love the information,, its great , <3